A new way of showcasing the maker's mark

My great grandfather, Duncan Henry Inverarity, was a renowned architect in South Perth and rural Western Australia in the early decades of the 20th Century. I remember being shown some of his buildings, the South Perth Council Chambers, the South Perth Police Station, the Kellerberrin Farmers’ Cooperative Building among others, and reading his name chiselled in the foundation stones that were all the go in those days.

  South Perth CC Foundation Stone

South Perth CC Foundation Stone

As an artist I understand the importance of the maker’s signature, or mark, and the challenge that it should contribute to and not detract from the piece it marks. We used a lot of old corrugated iron in our project and a pleasant surprise was discovering the maker’s mark on the underside of sheets of iron, some of which were 150 years old. Of course, we had to showcase these. They are very prominent and unavoidable.

 The maker's mark on the sheets of corrugated iron, around 150 years old.

The maker's mark on the sheets of corrugated iron, around 150 years old.

On the other hand, the signatures of the designers have been discreetly integrated material. The artist’s mark is concealed amongst the corrugated iron.

 The artist’s mark is concealed amongst the corrugated iron.

The artist’s mark is concealed amongst the corrugated iron.

And the designer's mark amongst the rusted steel.

 The designer's mark amongst the rusted steel.

The designer's mark amongst the rusted steel.